Jhpiego at ASTMH: Performance Quality Improvement for IPTp in Kenya

Monday afternoon (3 October 2014) at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Jhpiego and USAID/PMI are sponsoring a panel on “Integrating and Innovating: Strengthening Care for Mothers and Children with Infectious Diseases.” If you are at the meeting please attend to learn more about our Malaria activities in Kenya.

Endemic areasOne of the panel presentations is “Performance Quality Improvement Lending to Corrected Documented Outcomes for Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Kenya,” by Jhpiego staff Muthoni Kariuki, Augustine Ngindu Isaac Malonza, and Sanyu Kigondu, who are working with USAID’s Maternal & Child Health Integrated Project (MCHIP).

According to Malaria policy in Kenya all pregnant women in malaria endemic areas receive free intermittent preventive treatment with SP have access to free malaria diagnosis and treatment when presenting with fever have access to LLINs (National Malaria Strategy (NMS) 2009–2017).

By 2013 80% of people living in malaria risk areas should be using appropriate malaria preventive interventions. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of malaria in pregnancy using Sulfadoxine Pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) intervention is recommended for use in malaria endemic region.

PQI approachMCHIP broadly implemented Capacity Development and service delivery and improvement interventions that also had impact on the delivery of malaria in pregnancy services through collaboration with the Ministry of Health divisions/units at national level: (malaria, reproductive health, community health).

At county level scale up provision of IPTp at facility level took place in 14 malaria endemic counties. This included 8 counties in the lake endemic region including Bondo sub-county (the MCHIP model sub-county) and 6 in the coastal endemic region.

Quality Improvement through Performance Quality Improvement (PQI) process was instituted to enhance service delivery. The MCHIP era in Bondo Strengthened ANC Services using the following:

  • Development of MIP Standards-Based Management and Recognition (SBM-R) standards
  • Orientation of facility in-charges, supervisors and service providers on the standards
  • Monitoring of IPTp uptake using DHIS2 data
  • Feedback to facility in-charges and supervisors on DHIS2 findings
  • Collection of ANC data from ANC registers (2011-2013)
  • Feedback to facility in-charges and supervisors on ANC data

Quality improvement in the malaria in pregnancy component was undertaken with the objective to improve quality of MIP services including IPTp data management at facility level using PQI approach. An Example of a MIP SBM-R standard is seen below.

Sample StandardIn-service training focused on orientation of facility in-charges on PQI who then continued orientation at Facility Level. Overall we oriented 1200 facility in-charges and 100 supervisors on the standards. Facility in-charges cascaded orientation to 2,441 service providers.

ANC DataWe then analysed ANC data from DHIS (2011-2013) indicated proportion of pregnant women receiving IPTp2 was higher than IPTp1 (IPTp2+ doses reported as IPTp2 dose). We helped improve reporting by  service providers not oriented on use of the ANC register in order to reduce data errors.

In conclusion, PQI is a best practice in provision of MIP services. Standardization of knowledge among service providers is essential in provision of quality MIP services. Development of facility in-charges as mentors in the facility to ensure continued orientation of new service providers.

Use of appropriate monitoring tools is necessary to assist in assessment of quality of services provided including data management. Feedback to service providers is one of the performance rewards and encourages participation in knowledge acquisition

 

 

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