Posts or Comments 24 June 2024

Community &Funding &HIV Bill Brieger | 19 Mar 2024 09:13 am

Resources for HIV Financing in Nigeria: Empowering Local HIV Control Organizations

Tom Kehinde has posted an important perspective on local and community action in HIV control on the blog for the course Social and Behavioral Foundations of Primary Health Care. See the key issues from that posting below.

Nigeria grapples with one of the highest burdens of HIV/AIDS globally, with an estimated 1.9 million people living with the virus. Despite significant international assistance, the country heavily relies on external financing to combat the epidemic. This dependency on foreign aid is unsustainable in the long term and undermines Nigeria’s ability to address the epidemic effectively, perpetuating health disparities and social inequalities. Marginalized populations, such as women, youth, face heightened vulnerability to HIV infection due to limited access to prevention, treatment, and care services. To confront this pressing issue, empowering local HIV control organizations through increased domestic funding not only enhances their capacity to deliver targeted interventions but also fosters community ownership and sustainability.

(Photo source: The guardian)

Highlighting the position of stakeholders on this issue, firstly, WHO plays a pivotal role in providing technical guidance and support to countries like Nigeria in combating HIV/AIDS. Collaborating with WHO to develop evidence-based guidelines and technical assistance programs could bolster Nigeria’s efforts towards mobilizing domestic resources for HIV financing. National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA): the leading agency responsible for HIV/AIDS control in Nigeria, NACA advocates for increased domestic financing and empowerment of local HIV control organizations. Partnering with NACA to strengthen advocacy efforts and capacity-building initiatives could drive policy change. Despite the importance of mobilizing domestic resources for HIV financing, several challenges persist. These include inadequate funding allocations in national budgets, limited institutional capacity for effective resource mobilization and management. Developing a strategic plan such prioritizing advocacy for increased domestic funding for HIV/AIDS programs, enhance coordination among stakeholders, strengthen institutional capacity for resource mobilization and management, and promote community engagement and ownership of HIV/AIDS interventions. To conclude, mobilizing domestic resources for HIV financing is vital for Nigeria’s epidemic control. WHO must provide tailored guidelines, technical support, and advocate for local engagement. NACA should prioritize policy advocacy such as lobbying for increased budget allocations, strengthen collaboration as establishing joint task forces with other government agencies and NGOs, facilitating resource-sharing and coordinated efforts, and enhance community involvement. These concerted efforts will empower local organizations, bolster health systems, and mitigate the HIV burden, fostering sustainable development.

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