Posts or Comments 17 June 2024

Archive for "Behavior Change"



Behavior Change Bill Brieger | 07 Feb 2024

Malaria Behavior Survey Data Dashboard

Mike Toso, Senior Program Officer at the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs shares an update on visualizing malaria behaviors and determinants of malaria behaviors.

Breakthrough ACTION and the U.S. President’s Malaria Initiative are excited to announce the launch of the Malaria Behavior Survey (MBS) Dashboard, a new resource available on the MBS website.

The MBS Dashboard presents cross-sectional data collected from individuals and households in sub-Saharan African countries. This interactive dashboard allows users to explore MBS data on a single easy-to-explore platform. Currently, the dashboard includes data from six countries, and Breakthrough ACTION plans to add others as data points become available.

The dashboard shows a selection of the most important data points from the full MBS. It can be easily accessed on one’s smartphone if users are out in the field or at an informal meeting.

Additionally, the dashboard uses the collected data to make recommendations for program implementers to follow. These recommendations are generated dynamically, corresponding to the selected country’s data. National malaria programs and other partners working in malaria SBC can use MBS results to develop evidence-based malaria SBC programs and strategies.

The MBS is unique in that it gathers data on the behavioral factors that influence people’s use of malaria prevention and treatment interventions. Surveys in multiple countries often measure behaviors but do not assess the cognitive, emotional, or social factors associated with those behaviors. Such insights will help programs more fully address the needs of individuals and communities in combating malaria.

Link to blog post: https://ccp.jhu.edu/2023/04/24/malaria-dashboard-data-research/ “New Malaria Behavior Survey Dashboard “Like a Swiss Army Knife”

Link to Malaria Minute podcast: https://publichealth.jhu.edu/malaria-research-institute-1 (episode “How can Behavioral Science Improve Bed Net Use” 5/15/2023

 

 

 

 

 

Antenatal Care (ANC) &Behavior Change &Communication &ITNs Bill Brieger | 20 Nov 2021

Factors affecting adoption of malaria-preventive behaviors among populations at high risk of malaria in Cote d’Ivoire

Save the Children designs programs to protect children and families from malaria. An important aspect of the design process is learning about the factors that influence community members’ behaviors related to the prevention of the disease. Here we learn about behavioral factors that must be considered to design effective programs. This information is being presented at the 2021 American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting. See Author List below.

Understanding the drivers of malaria-related behavior helps national malaria control programs and implementing partners to plan national malaria strategies and to tailor interventions accordingly. This study examined the factors affecting adoption of malaria behaviors and those that drive or inhibit them among populations at high risk of malaria in Cote d’Ivoire.

This study was a multi-method, qualitative study with an exploratory approach using focus group discussions (FGDs), in-depth interviews (IDIs) and life stories. The study was conducted in 12 health districts across 10 health regions of Cote d’Ivoire in both urban and rural areas. FGDs and life stories were conducted with pregnant women and mothers of children under 5 and men (heads of household). IDIs were conducted with a number of stakeholders including: departmental district directors; midwives, nurses, community health workers, leaders of women’s groups, community leaders, and the local media.

The findings from this study show that incorrect knowledge about LLINs, LLIN dislike and discomfort, housing structure and size, sleeping arrangements for children under 5, and lack of LLIN recycling strategies were among the root causes for incorrect, non-use and/or inconsistent use of LLINs. In terms of ANC attendance, the main reported barriers were influence of their beliefs and norms, cost, perceived poor services provided, bad experiences from gynecological examinations, and the distance of health facilities in rural areas. Additionally, the lack of information on the benefits of SP for prevention of malaria in pregnancy and the use of traditional medicine were the main barriers for SP in pregnancy. Cost, poor services by health care providers and stock outs were the main barriers to diagnosis and treatment for children U5.  The main factor that influenced the adoption of preventive measures was free LLIN distribution through ANC viists and mass distribution campaigns.

Findings from this study are useful to inform the revision of the Social Behavior Change Communication Strategy in Cote d’Ivoire. Additionally, they can inform key messaging and the design of interventions in a context where malaria is the main cause of morbidity and mortality and children under 5 and pregnant women are the most affected.

AUTHOR LIST:

Jacob Y. Agniman1, Manasse N. Kassi1, Yssouf Ouattara1, Edouard C. Balogoun1, Serge B. Assi2, Philomène A. Beda1, Michel N’da-Ezoa3, Aristide E. Kouadio1, Joel Koffi1, Apollinaire N. Kouadio1, Paul Bouey4, Sara Canavati4, Eric Swedberg4 — 1Save the Children, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 2Le Programme Nationale de Lutte contre le Paludisme (PNLP), Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 3Socio-Anthropologue de la Santé, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 4Save the Children, Washington, DC, United States