Posts or Comments 04 December 2021

ITNs &Mosquitoes Bill Brieger | 19 Nov 2021 01:24 pm

Mosquito net knowledge, ownership, use, acceptability and preferences

Save the Children addresses various ways to protect children and families from malaria. Here we learn about Mosquito net knowledge, ownership, use, acceptability and preferences among primary caregivers of children under 5 years of age, pregnant women and household heads in Cote d’Ivoire. This information is being presented at the 2021 American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting. See Author List below.

Strengthening vector control measures among populations at higher risk of malaria, such as pregnant women and children under 5 years of age (U5s), is crucial to malaria control. Cote d’Ivoire has set itself a number of targets for malaria control by 2025. These include: at least 90% of the population are aware of national malaria prevention measures and at least 80% of the general population, pregnant women and children U5 sleep under an LLIN. One of the specific aims of this study was to assess mosquito net knowledge, ownership, use, acceptability and preferences of primary caregivers of children U5, pregnant women and household heads.

A mixed-methods study was conducted in rural and urban areas in 20 health districts of Cote d’Ivoire. A total of 1,812 households composed of 8,813 members were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. Only households who had one or more children under five years of age and/or a pregnant woman were included in the study. Qualitative data were gathered through twenty focus group discussions. Data triangulation of the qualitative and quantitative data was used during analysis.

Sixty percent of participants cited mosquito nets as the main malaria preventive measure. The majority of participants (95.6%) received information on the use of mosquito nets and over half of them received it from mass distribution campaign agents (51.1%). Although 79.5% of households owned at least one mosquito net, less than half (46.47%) owned one mosquito net for two people. The majority (98.2%) of participants received a free mosquito net. Nets were reportedly received mainly through mass distribution campaigns (54.99%) and ANC visits (39.0%). Self-reported mosquito net use by the head of households was 53.5%. This was higher for pregnant women and children U5, 76.2% and 83.2% respectively. However, only 53.0% of mosquito nets were suspended over a bed. Reasons for not using a mosquito nets were feeling of suffocation, heat, side effects, and poor condition of the mosquito net.

While mosquito net was reported as the main malaria preventive measure, mosquito net coverage and use remains below national targets. In addition, there was a noted gap between coverage and net use, potentially undermining the effectiveness of net-related interventions that could impact malaria control efforts in Cote d’Ivoire. The design, material, and condition of nets are important factors for user preferences that appear to drive net use.

AUTHOR LIST:

Edouard C. Balogoun1, Manasse N. Kassi1, Philomène A. Beda1, Serge B. Assi2, Jacob Y. Agniman1, Florence Kadjo-Kouadio3, Michel N’da-Ezoa4, Aristide E. Kouadio1, Joel Koffi1, Apollinaire N. Kouadio1, Paul Bouey5, Sara Canavati5, Eric Swedberg5 — 1Save the Children, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 2Le Programme Nationale de Lutte contre le Paludisme (PNLP), Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 3Médecin spécialiste de Santé, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 4Socio-Anthropologue de la Santé, Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, 5Save the Children, Washington, DC, United States

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