Malaria at AIDS2014

Malaria and HIV/AIDS interact on several fronts from the biological, clinical, pharmacological to the service delivery levels.  The ongoing 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia (July 20-25, 2014) provides an opportunity to discuss some of these issues. Abstracts that are available as of 20th July are mentioned below and deal largely with integrated health service delivery issues. Details can be found at http://www.aids2014.org/. Also keep up to date on twitter at https://twitter.com/AIDS_conference, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/InternationalAIDSConference.

8577_760104147337737_5024191_n1. Increasing HIV testing and counseling (HTC) uptake through integration of services at community and facility level (TUPE358 – Poster Exhibition). E. Aloyo Nyamugisa, B. Otucu, J.P. Otuba, L. Were, J. Komagum, F. Ocom, C. Musumali (USAID/NU-HITES Project, Plan International – Uganda, Gulu, Uganda).

HTC integration at community outreaches and facility service points increases service uptake by individuals, families and couples that come to access the different services that are offered concurrently such as immunization, family planning, cervical cancer screening, circumcision, Tuberculosis, malaria, nutrition screening services and other medical care.

2. Asymptomatic Malaria and HIV/AIDS co-morbidity in sickle cell disease (SCD) among children at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda (TUPE074 – Poster Exhibition). B.K. Kasule, G. Tumwine, (Hope for the Disabled Uganda, Kampala, Uganda, Watoto Child Care Ministries, Medical Department, Kampala, Uganda, Makerere University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources & Bio-security, Kampala, Uganda).

The prevalence of HIV/AIDS and asymptomatic malaria in children attending SCD clinic were quite high with the former exceeding the national prevalence supporting the view than Ugandan children with SCD die before five years. Children were significantly stunted and underdeveloped which could have made them prone to increased clinic visits. National health programmes should focus on the health needs of children with SCD by integrating HIV/AIDS care, nutritional therapy, and malaria control programmes.

3. Technical support (TS) needs of countries for preparation of funding requests under the Global Fund’s new funding model (NFM) (THPE427 – Poster Exhibition). A. Nitzsche-Bell, B. Hersh (UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland).

The results of this survey suggest that there is very high demand GF funding in 2014 and a concomitant high demand for TS to assist in the preparation of funding requests. TS priority needs span across different technical, programmatic and management areas. Increased availability of funding for TS and enhanced partner coordination through the Country Dialogue process are needed to ensure that countries have access to timely, demand-driven, and high-quality TS to maximize mobilization of GF resources under the NFM.

4. Optimizing the efficiency of integrated service delivery systems within the existing scaled-up community health strategy in Kenya: pathfinder/USAID/APHIAplus Nairobi-Coast program experience (THPE351 – Poster Exhibition). V. Achieng Ouma, D.M. Mwakangalu, P. Eerens, J. Mwitari, E. Mokaya, J. Aungo Bwo’nderi, S. Naketo Konah (Pathfinder International, Nairobi, Kenya, Pathfinder International, Service Delivery, Mombasa, Kenya, Ministry of Health, Division of Community Health Strategy, Nairobi, Kenya, Pathfinder International, Research and Metrics/Strategic Information Hub, Nairobi, Kenya, University of Portsmouth, Geography, Portsmouth, United Kingdom).

APHIAplus (a USAID sponsored health program in Kenya) supports the implementation of integrated government strategies that center around HIV, AIDS, and tuberculosis prevention, treatment, and care; integrated reproductive health and family planning services; and integrated malaria prevention and maternal and newborn health services. Lessons learned include the finding that integrated outreach holds potential to meet clients’ needs in an efficient, effective manner. For example, during a single contact with a service provider, a mother obtains immunization services and growth monitoring for her infant, counseling and testing for HIV, counseling on family planning, cervical cancer screening, and treatment of minor ailments. Results indicate better integration of HIV prevention, care, and treatment within complementary efforts that address key drivers of mortality and morbidity. Success in integration was fostered by a stronger focus on outcomes throughout the APHIAplus implementation cycle.

5. Long term outcomes of HIV-infected Malawian infants started on antiretroviral therapy while hospitalized (THPE070 – Poster Exhibition). A. Bhalakia, M. Bvumbwe, G.A. Preidis, P.N. Kazembe, N. Esteban-Cruciani, M.C. Hosseinipour, E.D. Mccollum (Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Pediatrics, Bronx, United States, Baylor College of Medicine Abbott-Fund Children’s Clinical Centre of Excellence, Lilongwe, Malawi, Baylor College of Medicine, Pediatrics, Houston, United States, University of North Carolina Project, Lilongwe, Malawi, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonology, Baltimore, United States).

AIDS2014 bannerOne-year retention rates of HIV-infected infants diagnosed and started on ART in the hospital setting are comparable to outpatient ART initiations in other Sub-Saharan countries. Further studies are needed to determine if inpatient diagnosis and ART initiation can provide additional benefit to this population, a subset of patients with otherwise extremely high mortality rates.  Of the 16 children who died, median time from ART initiation to death was 2.7 months. Causes of death include pneumonia, diarrhea, fever, anemia, malnutrition, malaria and tuberculosis.

6. Killing three birds with one stone: integrated community based approach for increasing access to AIDS, TB and Malaria services in Oyo and Osun States of Nigeria (MOPE435 – Poster Exhibition). O. Oladapo, E. Olashore, K. Onawola, M. Ijidale. (PLAN Health Advocacy and Development Foundation, Programs, Ibadan, Nigeria, Civil Society for the Eradication of Tuberculosis in Nigeria, Programs, Ibadan, Nigeria, Community and Child Health Initiative (CCHI), Programs, Ibadan, Nigeria, Community Health Focus (CHeF), Programs, Ibadan, Nigeria).

Community Systems Strengthening (CSS) is a tested and successful strategy for providing integrated AIDS, TB and Malaria (ATM) services in resource-limited settings. 20 selected community based organizations (CBOs) working on at least one of AIDS, TB or Malaria were trained by PLAN Foundation on basics of ATM-related project management including monitoring and evaluation; demand generation through active referrals; and community outreaches. Empowering CBOs is an effective and low-cost strategy for increasing demand for ATM services in resource-limited settings. Integrating referral for ATM services increases effectiveness of and public confidence in primary healthcare services at the grassroots.

7. (Upcoming on 21st July) The health impact of a program to integrate household water treatment, hand washing promotion, insecticide-treated bed nets, and pediatric play activities into pediatric HIV care in Mombasa, Kenya (MOAE0104 – Oral Abstract Session). N. Sugar, K. Schilling, S. Sivapalasingam, A. Ahmed, D. Ngui, R. Quick. (Project Sunshine, New York, United States, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, CDC, Atlanta, United States, New York University, New York, United States, Bomu Hospital, Mombasa, Kenya).

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