Improving provision of malaria services through provider training in Burkina Faso

Colleagues[1] from Jhpiego’s Burkina Faso Improving Malaria Care USAID-supported project and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of public Health are presenting a poster at the 64th ASTMH Annual Meeting in Philadelphia at noon on Tuesday 27th October 2015. Please stop by Poster 969 and discuss the results as presented in the Abstract below.

Staff to be trainedIn 2013, malaria was the main reason for consultation (53.90%), hospitalization (63.20%) and death (49.60%) in health facilities; children under 5 and pregnant women are most affected. Recent revisions to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) guidance to maintain effective approaches to defeating malaria, include monthly dosing of intermittent preventive treatment for pregnant women (IPTp), starting from the 13th week of gestation.

To align with the latest WHO guidance, the Burkina Faso Ministry of Health, with support from the USAID-funded Improving Malaria Care (IMC) project, revised national malaria guidelines in March 2014. 68 trainers from 9 health regions were trained on the revised national malaria guidelines.

From June to September 2014, 744 providers from 524 health facilities in 21 districts (33%) were trained on the prevention and management of malaria cases. To ensure updated guidance reaches all health workers, the training included a module on how to update colleagues in their respective facilities.

IPT coverage increases 2During supervision visits, most trained providers were using the new guidelines and pregnant women are increasingly receiving the third and higher doses of SP before delivery. In the first six months after the training sessions, pregnant women, who received the third dose of SP (IPTp3) increased from 0% to 12%. Three months later, that proportion rose to 30%. Comparatively, in the remaining 42 districts who received only the copies of the new guideline without training, IPTp3 was 5% nine months after receiving the guidelines.

The training sessions contributed to improving the implementation of revised IPTp guidelines and uptake of IPTp 3 and higher better than distribution of the new guidelines alone. As a result the IMC project will scale-up the training in Year 2 to 600 more providers from 464 health facilities, and other partners have also agreed to support the National Malaria Control Program to reach remaining facilities. Challenges in increasing IPTp uptake include commodity distribution and inadequate engagement of private health facilities to update their practices and reporting of SP distribution.

 

 

[1] Ousman Badolo, Stanislas Nebie, Moumouni Bonkoungou, Mathurin Dodo, Thierry Ouedraogo, Rachel Waxman, William R. Brieger

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